Ginkgos roasting on an open fire.

It’s the season when nuts fall from trees, and since there are no squirrels in Kyushu, they end up in enormous bags at the grocers.

I made chestnuts a few weeks ago. I’d never done it, but having heard a certain Christmas song many times, I figured I could just wing it and toss them under the broiler. Big mistake. It sounded like a scene from The Untouchables inside my stove, and I was forced to turn the heat off early for fear of blowing up my house. I checked with Chef Google (phrase adapted from my inventive friend Bethany) and found out that chestnuts should be scored before heating – cut an X into one side of the nuts before roasting.

So now I know. And thank goodness, because I was ready when a thoughtful friend, Kyrsten, handed me a bag of ginkgo nuts. I’d never had them before. “Toast them in oil,” she said, then after a pause, “They can, um, explode, so you might want to put a lid on your pan.”

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I followed the directions and this time I knew what to expect. After about 6 minutes of terrifying pops and pings, the nuts were ready. They were just as she said they’d be – transluscent and green. I added a little course salt and gingerly ate one.

It tasted like bacon. Smoky and unctuous.

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They’re best hot of the stove; I’m sure you could use them creatively, but I did enjoy them as an otsumami-style snack. Apparently you should not eat more than a few ginko nuts a day – poison and all that. I ate 15, maybe 20, and I feel fine. So far.

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